Father & Son Used Tires


Family Tires with Family Prices

Welcome to Educate Yourself! This section of our site will help you the car owner make the best decisions for your car and tires. 

WHAT DO THE NUMBERS ON MY TIRE MEAN?

The numbers on your tire tell you the size, type, and performance of the tire.

Tire Type: The letter "P" at the beginning of the "Tire Size" tells us that the tire is a passenger rated tire.

If a tire size has no letters at the beginning, this means its sized by European standards.

The letters "LT," either at the beginning or at the end of the tire size means that the tire is a Light truck tire. LT tires usually need a lot more air than passenger tires. 

Consult your owner's manual or tire placard located on the inside of your driver door to see what tire is recommended by the manufacturer.

Tire Width is the width of the tire measured in millimeters from sidewall to sidewall. The first three-digit number in the tire size refers to the tire width. For instance, in a size P215/65 R15 tire, the width is 215 millimeters.
Aspect Ratio is the ratio of the height of the tire's cross-section to its width. The two-digit number after the slash mark in a tire size is the aspect ratio. For example, in a size P215/65 R15 tire, the 65 means that the height is equal to 65% of the tire's width. The bigger the aspect ratio, the bigger the tire's sidewall will be.
Construction. The letter "R" in a tire size stands for Radial, which means the layers run radially across the tire.
Wheel Diameter is the size of the wheel measured from one end to the other. It tells us the size of the wheel that the tire is intended to fit. A size P215/65 R15 tire is made for a wheel with a 15" diameter.

Load Index indicates the maximum load that the tire can support when properly inflated. You'll also find the maximum load on the tire sidewall, in both pounds and kilograms. Click here to view a Load Index Table.


Speed Rating tells you the maximum speed capability of a tire. Often speed ratings are matched to the top speed capability of the vehicle. For example, a tire with an H-speed rating has a maximum speed capability of 130 mph or 210 km/h. Goodyear does NOT recommend exceeding legally posted speed limits. View Speed Rating Chart


DOT Symbol: The letters "DOT" on the sidewall indicate that the tire complies with all applicable Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards in the United States.


Tire Identification Number: The series of letters and numbers following the letters "DOT." The TIN consists of up to 12 numbers and letters to identify the factory location and the week and year the tire was manufactured.


UTQG stands for Uniform Tire Quality Grading, a rating system developed by the U.S. Department of Transportation to provide consumers with information to help them purchase tires based on their relative treadwear, traction and temperature capabilities.

Traction grades indicate the wet traction of a tire under a controlled test. A tire with an "AA" rating offers outstanding traction in wet conditions.


Temperature grades indicate the ability of the tire to withstand and dissipate destructive heat. A tire with a higher temperature grade is able to operate at higher speeds.


Treadwear grades are based on standardized government tests to help predict the expected treadwear of a tire. For example, a tire with a treadwear grade of 200 should last twice as long as a tire with a treadwear grade of 100.


"Whats on Your Sidewall?" Www.justtires.com. Web. 11 Dec. 2015.


Warning Signs You Need New Brakes

BY JEFF YOUNGS, FEBRUARY 24, 2012
They may not be something you think about very often, but your vehicle's brakes are one feature that should always be in top working condition. Let's look at how to know when you need new brakes.

Look, listen
There are two ways to check for brake wear on disc brakes: by looking and by listening. First, check for wear by looking at your brake pads through the spaces between the wheel's spokes. The outside pad will be pressed against a metal rotor. Generally, there should be at least 1/4 inch of pad. If you see less than 1/4 inch of pad, you may want to have your brake pads inspected or replaced.

Have you ever heard a high-pitched screeching sound when you applied your brakes? That's a small metal shim, called an indicator, which is giving you an audible warning that you need to replace your brake pads. You should be aware of this sound (which is loud enough to be heard while the windows are up, but not necessarily loud enough to be heard over the radio or air conditioner). If you hear it regularly, quickly make an appointment with your mechanic.

One exception is if your car has been sitting after being exposed to water, such as from rain or from washing it. The moisture can cause a thin layer of rust to develop on the brake rotors. This is normal. When you first apply the brakes, the pads pressing on the rust-covered rotors may cause a squeal for a few stops until the rust is worn off and then the sound will disappear.

Here are some other signs of brake problems. If you experience any of these, you should visit your repair shop as soon as possible:

Reduced responsiveness or fading. If your brakes are not as responsive as they should be or if the pedal "sinks" toward the floor, this could be an indication of a leak in the braking system. It could be an air leak (in the brake hose) or a brake fluid leak. One telltale sign of a brake fluid leak is the presence of a small puddle of fluid when the car is parked. Brake fluid looks similar to fresh motor oil, but with a less "slimy" texture.

Pulling. If your vehicle "pulls" to one side while braking, it may be a sign that the brake linings are wearing unevenly or that there is foreign matter in the brake fluid. Your vehicle may need a brake adjustment or to have the fluid drained and replaced.

Grinding or growling. This loud metallic sound means that you have worn down the pads completely, most likely beyond replacement. The grinding or growling noise is caused by the two pieces of metal (the disc and the caliper) rubbing together. This can "score," or scratch your rotors, creating an uneven surface. If this happens, do not be surprised if your mechanic tells you that the rotors need to be "turned" (a process that evens out the rotor surface), or even replaced.

Vibration. A vibration or pulsating brake pedal is often a symptom of warped rotors (but can also indicate that your vehicle is out of alignment). The vibration can feel similar to the feedback in the brake pedal during a panic stop in a vehicle equipped with anti-lock brakes.

It is a sign of warped rotors if the vibration occurs during braking situations when the anti-lock brakes are not engaged. Warped rotors are caused by severe braking for long periods, such as when driving down a steep mountain or when towing. Tremendous amounts of friction are created under these conditions, heating up the rotors and causing them to warp. The vibration is felt because the brake pads are not able to grab the surface evenly. If you drive in these conditions, make sure to stop periodically to allow your brakes to cool off.

For many owners, maintaining the vehicle's brakes is something that is often overlooked. But keeping your brakes properly calibrated and in good working order can prevent costly repairs down the line, and, more importantly, help you avoid a collision.

Youngs, J. (2012, February 24). Warning Signs You Need New Brakes. Retrieved December 17, 2015, from http://www.jdpower.com/cars/articles/tips-advice/warning-signs-you-need-new-brakes